How do you cook it?

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Derek

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What are you aiming for flavor wise?
I usually enjoy something sweeter, but I'm honestly not picky. I just have a lot of time on my hands right now, and I've never been much of a cook.
 

Sebastian

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I usually enjoy something sweeter, but I'm honestly not picky. I just have a lot of time on my hands right now, and I've never been much of a cook.
For a teriyaki, try a mix of soy sauce, garlic, a little lemon and brown sugar.
 

Randolphkeys

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If you want a challenge that pays off, here is how to make fresh ponzu: the official marinade of cooked meats in Japan:

  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • ½ cup citrus juice - experiment here, like lemon and orange. Just make sure it's fresh squeezed.
  • lemon zest from one lemon
  • 2 Tbsp mirin (2 Tbsp sake or water + 2 tsp sugar)
  • ½ cup katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes) (packed; 6 g) *this you might have to order from Amazon.
  • 1 piece kombu (dried kelp) (2" x 3" strip; 6 g) it's the green stuff that wraps your sushi.
 

Jack Brickman

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If you want a challenge that pays off, here is how to make fresh ponzu: the official marinade of cooked meats in Japan:

  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • ½ cup citrus juice - experiment here, like lemon and orange. Just make sure it's fresh squeezed.
  • lemon zest from one lemon
  • 2 Tbsp mirin (2 Tbsp sake or water + 2 tsp sugar)
  • ½ cup katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes) (packed; 6 g) *this you might have to order from Amazon.
  • 1 piece kombu (dried kelp) (2" x 3" strip; 6 g) it's the green stuff that wraps your sushi.
Really need to bring back that informative rating.
 

Hurl Bruce

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For those that sous vide, do you:
  • Season meat before sous vide?
  • Season meat after sous vide but before searing?
Can you:
  • Season all the meat, vacuum seal them and freeze for late?
  • Season the meat you plan on cooking the next day and sealing it?
Is it better to:
  • Freeze in a regular bag and sealing it later?
  • Seal and freeze?
 

Randolphkeys

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For those that sous vide, do you:
  • Season meat before sous vide?
  • Season meat after sous vide but before searing?
Can you:
  • Season all the meat, vacuum seal them and freeze for late?
  • Season the meat you plan on cooking the next day and sealing it?
Is it better to:
  • Freeze in a regular bag and sealing it later?
  • Seal and freeze?
I was told that seasoning the steak specifically before you sous vide dries out the meat, so it's best to salt and pepper right before the sear at the end. I used the Montreal Steak seasoning but some purists believe in just s&p. I could tell the steak was juicier.
 

Out of the Rafters at the Q

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For those that sous vide, do you:
  • Season meat before sous vide?
  • Season meat after sous vide but before searing?
Can you:
  • Season all the meat, vacuum seal them and freeze for late?
  • Season the meat you plan on cooking the next day and sealing it?
Is it better to:
  • Freeze in a regular bag and sealing it later?
  • Seal and freeze?
It depends what you're trying to accomplish. I add flavorings before sealing the bag, but salt I have to be careful with, as it chemically impacts the meat. Pepper is also something you have to realize burns/chars at high temps, so put it on after a sear if you want it fresh and fragrant, or before if you like that burnt pepper taste and crust. I typically both S&P later in the process.

You can definitely put all your flavorings in the bag, then freeze. I do it all the time. You want to seal then freeze--no reason to use multiple bags, and no reason to take less than a quality vacuum seal if you're freezing.
 

Randolphkeys

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You can definitely put all your flavorings in the bag, then freeze. I do it all the time. You want to seal then freeze--no reason to use multiple bags, and no reason to take less than a quality vacuum seal if you're freezing.
Agreed with freezing with seasonings/marinade with pork and chicken with this process, all the way.
 

Randolphkeys

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IMG_20200610_152529.jpg

Threw together Do Chua, the daikon and carrot slaw in Vietnamese food. Because why let others Bánh mì when I can banh myself.

I'm doing a beef ball pho and vermicelli rice noodles bowl with mahi mahi, need the slaw for the noodle bowls.
 

Randolphkeys

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A couple pics of yesterday's work. My eldest son is nine and I wanted to do something different to engage him in a project. So little is open, but the Asian grocery store is just weird enough to feel like an adventure. First we grated daikon and carrot to make the Do Chua. Dressing: 1/3 cup of white sugar and about one teaspoon of salt dissolved in a 1/2 cup of hot water, then 1/2 cup white vinegar.

IMG_20200610_182334.jpg

Then I did most of the work for the Vietnamese noodle salad with mahi mahi. I used a griddle instead of the grill this time because I just want a 2 minute sear on each side. The dressing for the noodle salad is as follows:

1 minced garlic clove
2 tablespoons of lime
2 tablespoons of white sugar
1/4 cup fish sauce
1/4 cup rice vinegar
Equal parts chopped mint, basil, and cilantro

Then most of the rice noodles get tossed in the dressing. The veggies I threw in included the Do Chua, shaved fennel, shaved iceberg lettuce, mung beans, green onions, and cucumber. I topped it with crushed peanuts for texture. It was pretty hot and I'm going to be eating this for a few days. Here's what it looked like:

IMG_20200610_184416.jpg

I was proud of the nine year old for essentially doing a beef pho on his own. There were shortcuts, but he measured everything out and mixed everything himself. I'm eating his leftovers right now.

The items cost a little over thirty bucks but it gave us all something to do besides fuck around online.
 

IWantAKouki

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Went British inspired tonight for whatever reason (that is, the lamb was on sale at Aldi and I've never cooked lamb so F it!)

Need to work on my plating skills but I already tried twice and then I got hungry. Actually I took a bite before taking pic below.

Rack of lamb over horseradish mashed potatoes with psuedo-mushy-peas and mushroom, dijon, rosemary, and red wine pan sauce.


Lamb was seared on all sides (hard sear on fat cap) then roasted in 300 oven until ~125 with mushrooms scattered around. Added pat of butter, rosemary, and whole smashed garlic cloves and seared/basted on all sides. Lamb, garlic, and most of fat out, bit of cheater flour, then red wine/dijon/S&P to make the pan sauce.

Edit: Elegantly plated on my laptop and served with ice cold Natural Light.
 

Randolphkeys

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Edit: Elegantly plated on my laptop and served with ice cold Natural Light.
If any protein deserves a quality and thoughtful drink pairing, it's lamb. Any mint infused drink like a mojito/julep or a higher end red wine should be the call. Natty is a crime against the palate.
 

IWantAKouki

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It's funny you should say that because I was talking to a fellow foodie just a bit ago who had never had lamb and asked what it tastes like. I said "It's kind of like a mild gamey beef mixed a well-kept lady's nether region".

But yeah, I did want to go out to the grocery and get some mint for the traditional pairing, but just been working in the yard all day and didn't feel like it.

I honestly probably would have gone to the trouble of muddling mint and lime only to pour Natty over it anyways.
 
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