Paying College Athletes/Letting Them Get Endorsements

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Derek

1 by land, 2 by sea, 3 Baerga
Joined
Jan 10, 2009
Messages
15,931
Reaction score
24,218
Points
135
Schools with the most money will get the best players. Schools with the best players will make the most money. Kickbacks on a much bigger level. I know we're talking about "endorsements"......but that's sort of a cop-out here.

It's fairly cut and dry to me (e.g. Professional sports).

How is that any different than our current system, minus the players actually being able to make some money?

I could actually see the schools getting less money from endorsements and advertisers when the option comes available to start buying off individual athletes.
 

Lord Mar

Master
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
18,885
Reaction score
12,903
Points
123
How is that any different than our current system, minus the players actually being able to make some money?

I could actually see the schools getting less money from endorsements and advertisers when the option comes available to start buying off individual athletes.

Yea, it's not much different....but I think it will make the disparity even worse. I mean, we might as well just do a Big 3 League for NCAA going forward.

Just let these guys go straight to the pros then.....
 

Derek

1 by land, 2 by sea, 3 Baerga
Joined
Jan 10, 2009
Messages
15,931
Reaction score
24,218
Points
135
Yea, it's not much different....but I think it will make the disparity even worse. I mean, we might as well just do a Big 3 League for NCAA going forward.

Just let these guys go straight to the pros then.....

How? I see it the exact opposite way.

Right now, players are choosing schools primarily for the opportunity to get drafted, and secondly to win championships. This naturally creates super teams.

However, if guys can cash in on endorsements, immediate playing time becomes a top priority. Nobody is paying endorsement money to a guy redshirting or working as a backup.

Is it better to be the 20th best player at Ohio State or the best player in the entire MAC for 3 or 4 years?

As I said, the answers aren't clear, but it sure would be interesting to find out. I can't imagine the disparity getting any worse. Ohio State has been outside the top 6 in the final AP poll four times since 2002, and two of those years they still played in the Orange and Fiesta bowls. Clemson is heading toward their fourth straight top 4 season. Alabama has been outside the top 6 twice since 2008, one of those was still a Sugar Bowl year.
 

bigfoot5415

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Messages
12,402
Reaction score
11,415
Points
123
I could be misinterpreting this situation, but it appears that the kids now have the ability to make money of their likeness. However, it does not gives schools the opportunity to capitalize on it as well. Am I correct?

Reason I ask is this basically gives the kids a shot to make money whether it be through autograph sessions, local commercials, sponsorships or the ability to host a paid camp.

It does not give the various team manufacturers the ability to make money off player jerseys & what not.
 

Lord Mar

Master
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
18,885
Reaction score
12,903
Points
123
I could be misinterpreting this situation, but it appears that the kids now have the ability to make money of their likeness. However, it does not gives schools the opportunity to capitalize on it as well. Am I correct?

Reason I ask is this basically gives the kids a shot to make money whether it be through autograph sessions, local commercials, sponsorships or the ability to host a paid camp.

It does not give the various team manufacturers the ability to make money off player jerseys & what not.

It does not directly give the various team manufacturers the ability to make money off player jerseys, etc.

More money more problems.....was that Puff Daddy or Mase who said that?
 

The Human Q-Tip

Alright you primitive screwheads, listen up!
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 15, 2008
Messages
29,125
Reaction score
48,277
Points
148
How is that any different than our current system, minus the players actually being able to make some money?

Because the imbalance will become much worse.
 

Derek

1 by land, 2 by sea, 3 Baerga
Joined
Jan 10, 2009
Messages
15,931
Reaction score
24,218
Points
135
Imagine the NFL with no salary cap, no draft, and all rookies are free agents. That's basically what would happen to big-time college sports.
That’s how it already is. At least with endorsements available, immediate playing time would be valued more.
 

JDailey23

NBA Starter
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
Messages
4,221
Reaction score
3,364
Points
113
That’s how it already is. At least with endorsements available, immediate playing time would be valued more.
Yeah, I agree with this. It already is this way.
One way to limit how much Universities make is to tax them some based off athletics. Not sure how exactly it would work, but these schools are making a killing.
 

The Human Q-Tip

Alright you primitive screwheads, listen up!
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 15, 2008
Messages
29,125
Reaction score
48,277
Points
148
That’s how it already is.

If that's truly how it is (it ain't), then there's no need to change anything because they're already getting paid just like they would under this plan, and they have no reason to complain.
 

JDailey23

NBA Starter
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
Messages
4,221
Reaction score
3,364
Points
113
If that's truly how it is (it ain't), then there's no need to change anything because they're already getting paid just like they would under this plan, and they have no reason to complain.
Pint me in the category of this not being needed. These kids get food, rooms, clothes, education, tutoring if needed. Ability to go back to school and finish their degree of they go pro. Sets up more entitlements for down the road. Most schools give out a stipend, increase it a little. It’s not hard.
 

AZ_

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Dec 6, 2007
Messages
38,945
Reaction score
45,506
Points
148
You're arguing against yourself. You say this when you're trying to say there's no harm because it's already happening all the time:

and

But then:

They're all making money...except they're not making money.

???

Allow me to clarify.

Those willing to get dirty, put their eligibility at risk to earn money on the side are getting paid.

Those abiding by the rules, regardless of whether or not they could, are not.

Allowing them to earn based on the magnitude of their image and likeness allows them to do this without risk.

And then in terms of the willingness of alumni to spend, you actually proved my point that alumni don't need hard numbers for ROI:

Things like "access and "special privileges at events" are non-economic benefits, and "tickets, parking, luxury boxes" are things they still actually have to pay for. Plus, that stuff and the rest of it is all based on their legal, public contributions to the athletic program. And most of that still isn't a quantifiable ROI.

But more importantly, what we're talking about are the illegal, under the table payments directly to athletes for which alumni receive no credit, and necessarily take pains to conceal. Yet, despite receiving no credit or discernable "return on investment" from those illegal payments, they do them (or have shown a willingness in the past absent NCAA crackdowns) anyway. Why? Simply because they're freakish fans and want the Tide (or whomever) to have the best team possible. So assuming they wouldn't funnel more money to athletes without provable ROI doesn't make sense. They've already shown that they simply want to help the team win and are willing to make illegal payments. How much more fun money will they be willing to spend if it doesn't have to be hidden?

I'm pretty sure most of that money was personal wealth, not embezzlement from a publicly-owned corporation. The only people they would have to explain their payments to are themselves. Either personal wealth, or the car dealerships they own (maybe with other alumni) etc..

Nike and other large, publicly traded corporations won't be fighting to get players to sign with Alabama v. Clemson or OSU. It's individually wealthy alumni who will be doing that.

Regardless of whether or not its personal wealth, or corporate/charity-based wealth, the reality is that we should not be disallowing earning potential based on the myth of amateurism.

Allowing companies to have athletes promote their products, if the market warrants it, harms nobody.
 

AZ_

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Dec 6, 2007
Messages
38,945
Reaction score
45,506
Points
148
I think it'd be a win for the current crop of upper tier student athletes who would get the most endorsement money. I'd question what it might mean for college football as a whole after being in effect for a few years.

That's ultimately the point. It is impossible to draw a clear, effective legal distinction between what we might normally consider an "endorsement", and money being paid by wealthy local boosters for the rights to the "image" of the athlete for his endorsement. If they're willing to blow their money to get that kid to come to their school even if they don't make it back in revenue (and we know already that they are), then it's a clear end-run.

Why not just let the market decide?

What is the benefit of preventing athletes from earning their full worth in an open market?

I have yet to see an argument that suggests earning money will benefit only major college programs. If anything, the staunch opposition from major college programs suggests quite the opposite.

The advantage of those programs is that they do things better in getting guys to the league to earn real money. Allow athletes to earn real money in college, and that expands the field of choice with regards to recruitment.
 

AZ_

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Dec 6, 2007
Messages
38,945
Reaction score
45,506
Points
148
Pint me in the category of this not being needed. These kids get food, rooms, clothes, education, tutoring if needed. Ability to go back to school and finish their degree of they go pro. Sets up more entitlements for down the road. Most schools give out a stipend, increase it a little. It’s not hard.

This is....just nonsensical.

But its maddening that entitled adults think they can tell kids what they're worth.
 
Top