Ray Fosse RIP

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CATS44

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Fosse arrived too early.

He was injury prone, the worst being a separated shoulder suffered in the collision with Pete Rose that first went undiagnosed, and then never healed properly. The advances is sports medicine today would have fixed that.

Much like Mark Fidrych, who suffered a torn rotator cuff that also went undiagnosed for eight years.
 
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Mcreek

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Fosse arrived too early.

He was injury prone, the worst being a separated shoulder suffered in the collision with Pete Rose that first went undiagnosed, and then never healed properly. The advances is sports medicine today would have fixed that.

Much like Mark Fidrych, who suffered a torn rotator cuff that also went undiagnosed for eight years.
Also the great young Bengals QB Greg Cook who suffered a rotator cuff injury that today would have healed in the off season after modern surgery.

Wayne Garlands surgery was also brutual by today’s advanced medicine. They literally cut the guys shoulder up. I’m sure countless others in those days.

Fosse once said his bat speed loss was the equivalent of a pitcher losing 10 MPH off his fastball .

Fosse was a 300 hitter with Power before the shoulder injury. His numbers would have dwarfed Thurman Munsons, and would have been more like Fisks but a higher BA
 

kidduck

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Ray Fosse, former Cleveland Indians All-Star catcher and A’s broadcaster, dead at 74

By Joe Noga, cleveland.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Ray Fosse, a two-time All-Star catcher for the Cleveland Indians who went on to have a long career as a beloved broadcaster for the Oakland Athletics, passed away Wednesday at age 74, the clubs confirmed.

Fosse’s wife, Carol, said in a statement online that he had fought cancer for 16 years.

Cleveland’s Senior Vice President of Public Affairs, Bob DiBiasio, called Fosse, the club’s top draft pick in 1965, a fan favorite who spent nearly 60 years in the game he loved.

“Ray was so proud to have worn an Indians uniform,” DiBiasio posted on Twitter. “One of the highlights of every summer was when Ray would come to town to broadcast Oakland A’s games. He will be missed.”

Fosse played eight seasons in Cleveland collecting 50 home runs, 230 RBI and 549 hits and earning selections to the Midsummer Classic and Gold Glove Awards in both 1970 and 1971. It was in the 12th inning of the 1970 All-Star game when Pete Rose famously collided with Fosse at home, fracturing his shoulder.

Cleveland traded Fosse to Oakland in 1973 where he won two World Series championships with the A’s before rejoining the Indians in 1976. He went on to make stops in Seattle and Milwaukee before retiring after the 1979 season. In 1986, Fosse joined the Athletics broadcast team where he remained for 35 seasons, stepping away in the middle of 2021.

In a statement, the A’s said few people epitomized what it meant to be an Athletic more than Fosse.

“He was the type of franchise icon who always made sure every player, coach, colleague, and fan knew that they were part of the Oakland A’s family.’’

Fosse also remained one of Cleveland’s most beloved personalities by fans both young and old. With Oakland playing a 2004 series at the ballpark now known as Progressive Field, Fosse found himself walking around downtown on a Saturday. He bumped into a Cleveland police officer who exclaimed: “You’re Ray Fosse. I watched you play at the old Stadium.”

Fosse’s wry reply: “You must have been 2 years old.”

His first visit to the new park in 1994 also marked the 17th anniversary of Dennis Eckersley’s no-hitter for Cleveland in 1977. Fosse was behind the plate to catch Eckersley that night as the Indians beat Frank Tanana and the Angels, 1-0.

”Wherever I put up the glove, he hit it,” Fosse told The Plain Dealer. “He had excellent control. Early on I had a feeling it was going to happen. His stuff was that good.”

In July 2001, the Indians named Fosse one of the franchise’s top 100 Greatest Players. During an on-field ceremony to honor all of the living members of that top 100 list Fosse was like a kid in a candy store. He exchanged a few laughs with franchise icon Rocky Colavito about their graying hair, and marveled at how many of his childhood heroes were present wearing Indians uniforms.

”I always collected baseball cards,” Fosse told The Plain Dealer that day. “I have Al Rosen’s card, probably the cards of all the guys in here. I started collecting cards in the ‘50s.”

In 1999, Fosse told The Plain Dealer that his favorite memory of playing in Cleveland was the first half of the 1970 season.

“It was magical,” Fosse said. “The fans were great. ... I never wanted to be traded. I always liked it here.”

Kidduck adds- Back in the day before Pete Rose, I was fortunate enough to attend a Tribe luncheon during
which one player was seated at each table. I got Fosse. He engaged in lively conversation throughout
the event . He had a good sense of humor and told funny 'g; rated baseball stories.

Safe trails to him.

I hope all of you are well. Good luck to us all.

Somehow I have gotten to be an old fogie. I still say record instead of vinyl.

Go Guardians!
 

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