The Trumpster Thread

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Rate Mssr. Trump's Performance

  • He is Tremendous. So Strong, So Good

    Votes: 8 10.0%
  • He's a Jackass But He Done Right By Me

    Votes: 10 12.5%
  • He is a Disgrace and Will Be Remembered Poorly

    Votes: 47 58.8%
  • Can We Just Have a Normal POTUS?

    Votes: 8 10.0%
  • I Live a Sheltered Life and I Don't Care

    Votes: 2 2.5%
  • Hillary Did It!

    Votes: 2 2.5%
  • All Things Considered, I'd Prefer a Maine Coon as King

    Votes: 3 3.8%

  • Total voters
    80

BimboColesHair

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Company I work for is closing 22 brick and mortars and modifying how 3 additional ones are operating (less staff needed) at the end of September, and this is a healthy business as well. Each location has anywhere from 5-15 employees. They can post for positions internally or go elsewhere and receive a severance package.

Sure, you can say 85% of the unemployment numbers are just from closures and they will go away simply by reopening places if it makes you feel better.

But the long term effects on the job market are still to come. We’ve already seen quite a few retail companies announce they are closing a number of stores.
 

-Akronite-

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Company I work for is closing 22 brick and mortars and modifying how 3 additional ones are operating (less staff needed) at the end of September, and this is a healthy business as well. Each location has anywhere from 5-15 employees. They can post for positions internally or go elsewhere and receive a severance package.

Sure, you can say 85% of the unemployment numbers are just from closures and they will go away simply by reopening places if it makes you feel better.

But the long term effects on the job market are still to come. We’ve already seen quite a few retail companies announce they are closing a number of stores.
The pandemic is accelerating the inevitable. We know what automation and the internet have done to brick and mortar stores and manufacturing labor. We need to find a better way forward than hoping a rushed re-opening will put our economy back together the way it was.

EDIT: Whoops, meant "pandemic." Wouldn't want you to think I believed in this disease that has killed 93 thousand Americans.
 

BimboColesHair

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The pandemic is accelerating the inevitable. We know what automation and the internet have done to brick and mortar stores and manufacturing labor. We need to find a better way forward than hoping a rushed re-opening will put our economy back together the way it was.
There won’t be a “way it was”. Similar to post 9/11 our new “normal” will be dramatically different. Trump’s base and his advisers, however, believe we can get to that, and it’s ridiculous and it shows in their “planning”.

It’s terrific that this pandemic is exposing how many people can do their jobs remotely from their homes. I’m lucky enough that I’m able to do that for the most part even under normal circumstances, but I’m glad the facade that you need to be at work to do work is going away. Americans have been caught up in that mindset longer than most developed 1st world countries are. The amount of remote work from home available to people is high, people just need to look for it in the right places.

But yes. We do more of the same and we hope simply reopening states and businesses will get us back to “record low unemployment!!!” we are in for an ugly result.

There are countless companies looking to cut dead weight expenditures, they’ve just been looking for a good reason to do so. This will be their reason, no chance in hell my company and places like Pier 1 are alone. Admittedly, the offices my company is closing are ones they planned on closing by 2020 as is, this just expedited things significantly. Huge shock to everyone this morning when it was announced because we received a plan at the beginning of the quarter on how it would be a slow set of closures to help eliminate job loss and shock to the company structure.

More of the long term effects on our unemployment and job market are unfortunately still to come, and they are coming. Re-opening won’t change shit for that.
 
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Bob_The_Cat

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Company I work for is closing 22 brick and mortars and modifying how 3 additional ones are operating (less staff needed) at the end of September, and this is a healthy business as well. Each location has anywhere from 5-15 employees. They can post for positions internally or go elsewhere and receive a severance package.

Sure, you can say 85% of the unemployment numbers are just from closures and they will go away simply by reopening places if it makes you feel better.

But the long term effects on the job market are still to come. We’ve already seen quite a few retail companies announce they are closing a number of stores.
And this will only increase when businesses see other businesses do it successfully. For basically every business, labor and rent are the two highest costs annually. If you can slash costs on both fronts, even if you experience a slight dip in sales your net revenue dramatically increases.

As buying habits have changed, it already made less-and-less sense to have the big box retailers. Given the current situation, people will become accustomed to having things delivered to them or picking up things at stores.

In reality, I think we see retailers making more money in the long run as a consumer is more likely to make impulse purchases online than in store. While it will eliminate some jobs, in the end new ones will be created. I would imagine we'll see a rise in delivery and installation/assembly jobs in particular as more retailers move online and we see an even greater demand for these services.

It also wouldn't shock me to see more regional delivery services pop-up. If you're say, Best Buy, Dick's Sporting Goods, and maybe Meijer, doesn't it make more sense to create shared warehouses and delivery services instead of relying on USPS (which could collapse) or eventually being taken over by Amazon? I'm not saying to merge companies, but just to create regional distribution and delivery services.
 

-Akronite-

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And this will only increase when businesses see other businesses do it successfully. For basically every business, labor and rent are the two highest costs annually. If you can slash costs on both fronts, even if you experience a slight dip in sales your net revenue dramatically increases.

As buying habits have changed, it already made less-and-less sense to have the big box retailers. Given the current situation, people will become accustomed to having things delivered to them or picking up things at stores.

In reality, I think we see retailers making more money in the long run as a consumer is more likely to make impulse purchases online than in store. While it will eliminate some jobs, in the end new ones will be created. I would imagine we'll see a rise in delivery and installation/assembly jobs in particular as more retailers move online and we see an even greater demand for these services.

It also wouldn't shock me to see more regional delivery services pop-up. If you're say, Best Buy, Dick's Sporting Goods, and maybe Meijer, doesn't it make more sense to create shared warehouses and delivery services instead of relying on USPS (which could collapse) or eventually being taken over by Amazon? I'm not saying to merge companies, but just to create regional distribution and delivery services.
While I agree new types of jobs will come from this, overall it appears there will be a massive net loss in jobs/employment. Many companies will have to return with less staff due to financial struggles. Some jobs are being made obsolete. And less people coming in to the office reduces revenues for auto/public transit, reduces need for maintenance staff, reduces traffic for cafes/restaurants, etc.

Beyond the obvious healthcare implications, the pandemic is showing why we need stronger social programs in general, such as a UBI.

And it's an interesting thought on how companies may shift to delivery service, but I really hope we don't let the USPS collapse regardless. If we rely on megacorps for our delivery services, I can guarantee that delivery will become more costly for consumers, many people will be cut off from service entirely, and we will be jeopardizing Democracy itself if we don't protect vote by mail.
 

Lee

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Company I work for is closing 22 brick and mortars and modifying how 3 additional ones are operating (less staff needed) at the end of September, and this is a healthy business as well. Each location has anywhere from 5-15 employees. They can post for positions internally or go elsewhere and receive a severance package.

Sure, you can say 85% of the unemployment numbers are just from closures and they will go away simply by reopening places if it makes you feel better.

But the long term effects on the job market are still to come. We’ve already seen quite a few retail companies announce they are closing a number of stores.
The predictions is 20% of restaraunts will not re-open, the ones remaining will have less business for now. Retail will have issues too as JC Penny just filed for BK as this shutdown took it from Zombie status to maybe all the way dead.

Now I don't know what you do, but your company is another issue we will face as companies will shrink to stay strong and not become a Zombie. It will take a few years to recover, re-opening is not a magic light switch. (I am agreeing with you, just expanding)
 

Zeus69

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Sebastian

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Ouffda.

What a stupid, pathetic, sack of shit. Just a complete child. Just like the daily approval poll emails I get sent everyday from his campaign. Astounding insecurity and lunacy.

But yes, go ahead, genius. Keep threatening key swing states.
 

-Akronite-

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Ouffda.

What a stupid, pathetic, sack of shit. Just a complete child. Just like the daily approval poll emails I get sent everyday from his campaign. Astounding insecurity and lunacy.

But yes, go ahead, genius. Keep threatening key swing states.
This is beyond childish or stupid, it's blatantly corrupt and should be treated as a serious scandal. The President wants to suppress the vote for his own political benefit and is abusing his office to those explicit ends. I certainly hope it backfires to be targeting swing state votes like this, but he has the power to potentially kill the Post Office and the GOP has no problem helping him double down on demonizing Democracy. The Democrats need to have some focus on this subject, because Trump will go to whatever ends he wants to manipulate this election.

To be clear, it's also really fucking stupid. He's dumb enough to think he can convince people mail in voting is somehow bad even though:
1) We're in a pandemic.
2) Millions of mail-in ballots have been cast in this country without much issue.
3) Our military relies on this form of voting.
4) The motherfucker voted by mail himself!
 

Phills14

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As always, if it's bad for him, it's illegal. If it's good for him, that same "illegal" thing is perfectly fine.
 

Zeus69

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MGMT

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What are the implications from withdrawing from the arms treaty aside from the obvious?
 

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