Car Advice

Cavatt

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And pretty much nobody does that aside from having 1 gallon of gas at home for the lawnmower.
But farmers often have gas tanks on their property! Owned! /S

Also wanted to say that batteries even in our lifetimes have gotten so much better. Remember when 9V batteries were in everything? They basically don't exist anymore outside of smoke detectors. AAA batteries were something I never heard of as a kid.

Nicads suck and now lithium batteries rule.

On the other hand cold fusion does not yet exist.
 

Nathan S

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It's because gas stations are available everywhere, not proprietary and you can fill up a full tank in less than 5 minutes. You can still fill up your tank at home though.
I think it's a question of where you can *purchase* gas, not where you can put it in your car. Obviously, you can put gas in your car (almost) anywhere. But you have to go to a gas station to buy it. Electricity you can buy at home. Depending on how you use your car, one may be more convenient than the other.
 

inliner311

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I think it's a question of where you can *purchase* gas, not where you can put it in your car. Obviously, you can put gas in your car (almost) anywhere. But you have to go to a gas station to buy it. Electricity you can buy at home. Depending on how you use your car, one may be more convenient than the other.
This kind of gets to the point of why car manufacturers are still making hybrids and the future might actually be plug in hybrids especially if algae gasoline or some other sort of biofuel gasoline can be scaled to mass production.

You can have a net neutral biofuel that people can use with their hybrid car to supplement their long trips when they are away from home or don't have time for charging. The infrastructure is already there with gas stations and the networks to move gasoline to where it's needed. It doesn't even need to be a engine that directly powers the wheels, it could be a generator like the BMW i3 has as an option or like the diesel hybrid buses that are currently being used.

I think hybrids will evolve closer to electric cars as time goes on, where people are only relying on gas as a backup or on long trips while electricity will be what they are primarily designed to be using.
 

Nathan S

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This kind of gets to the point of why car manufacturers are still making hybrids and the future might actually be plug in hybrids especially if algae gasoline or some other sort of biofuel gasoline can be scaled to mass production.

You can have a net neutrality biofuel that people can use with their hybrid car to supplement their long trips when they are away from home or don't have time for charging. The infrastructure is already there with gas stations and the networks to move gasoline to where it's needed. It doesn't even need to be a engine that directly powers the wheels, it could be a generator like the BMW i3 has as an option or like the diesel hybrid buses that are currently being used.

I think hybrids will evolve closer to electric cars as time goes on, where people are only relying on gas as a backup or on long trips while electricity will be what they are primarily designed to be using.
I can see that. But I think it's possible, maybe likely, that a large fraction of restaurants and stores will have electric chargers available in their parking lots in the medium-term (~20 years) future. That effect, combined with a gradual die-off in gas stations as fewer and fewer people use gas full-time, could make electric charging much more convenient (though still not faster) than gas fueling away from home. People will accept the occasional inconvenience of stopping for an hour when they travel long distances, and restaurants and businesses will salivate at the opportunity to lure in those stopping travelers. Gas/hybrid vehicles will still be respected nostalgia's sake and for the niche advantage of being able to travel 500+ miles as quickly as possible, in the same way that manual transmission cars are still a small but relevant minority today. That's my prediction anyway.
 

KI4MVP

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I think it's a question of where you can *purchase* gas, not where you can put it in your car. Obviously, you can put gas in your car (almost) anywhere. But you have to go to a gas station to buy it. Electricity you can buy at home. Depending on how you use your car, one may be more convenient than the other.
Yes, people get way too caught up on number of charging stations vs gas stations. Gas has to be transported somewhere to be loaded into your car. All homes have an electricity source to charge a car. You can also add solar panels to your roof and charge your car for free. With 300+ miles of range, most people with electric cars don't have to worry about anything besides plugging it for all but a few days, and those few days they have enough charging stations on their trip to make their trip, and they save quite a bit of money on fuel costs every time they drive.
 

KI4MVP

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This kind of gets to the point of why car manufacturers are still making hybrids and the future might actually be plug in hybrids especially if algae gasoline or some other sort of biofuel gasoline can be scaled to mass production.

You can have a net neutral biofuel that people can use with their hybrid car to supplement their long trips when they are away from home or don't have time for charging. The infrastructure is already there with gas stations and the networks to move gasoline to where it's needed. It doesn't even need to be a engine that directly powers the wheels, it could be a generator like the BMW i3 has as an option or like the diesel hybrid buses that are currently being used.

I think hybrids will evolve closer to electric cars as time goes on, where people are only relying on gas as a backup or on long trips while electricity will be what they are primarily designed to be using.
I don't see hybrids lasting. charging times are getting faster over time, why add all of the complexity and maintenance issues of an engine to an otherwise electric car?
 

Nathan S

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Yes, people get way too caught up on number of charging stations vs gas stations. Gas has to be transported somewhere to be loaded into your car. All homes have an electricity source to charge a car. You can also add solar panels to your roof and charge your car for free. With 300+ miles of range, most people with electric cars don't have to worry about anything besides plugging it for all but a few days, and those few days they have enough charging stations on their trip to make their trip, and they save quite a bit of money on fuel costs every time they drive.
Yeah, the key thing about charging stations is that it's very easy for businesses to add them once it makes sense economically to do so. Already there are enough people using electric vehicles that most hotels offer charging. Once a larger fraction of people are driving electric vehicles, more and more businesses will do the math and find that it makes sense to add charging stations to attract electric vehicle drivers. That in turn incentivizes more people to buy electric vehicles because wherever they're headed, there's probably a charging station waiting for them. Positive feedback.
 

inliner311

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I don't see hybrids lasting. charging times are getting faster over time, why add all of the complexity and maintenance issues of an engine to an otherwise electric car?
A small engine just used to generate electricity can be cheap and effect without adding much in weight or complexity. It expands the market for car makers and basically gives good selling points for consumers.

Like we are talking about 2 cylinder engines that run at a specific RPM to produce the optimal level to charge up the batteries. Really isn't complex at all.

I feel like it would be a selling point like AWD or a third row seat. It would probably be a $2-3k option that dealers would push people to get.

People that park on the street or like to take road trip or just don't have the time to stop to charge would probably opt for it. I could see it an easy selling point to families or housewives. All a salesmen would have to say is "what if you are running errands around town and forgot to charge when you notice you don't have enough range to pick your kids up in time. You want to stop and wait to charge the car or just stop at the gas station and get a couple gallons of gas?"

Dealers really dictate what options people get with cars. Like in NE Ohio, Audi dealers don't stock non-quattro cars, they just sit on the lot. It also hurts resale value if try to sell a FWD Audi in an area that gets snow. If something is initially a popular option, it probably wouldn't go away in the future because of how dealers stock their lots and the waiting period for special orders.
 
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brownindian

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Thanks for your suggestion. My SUV is out of warranty (Mazda does 4year /60k). I ave still asked the dealership to file a request to the Mazda WArranty service. Waiting to see what they say.
 

KI4MVP

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The built in sensors in every Tesla includes a built in security system at no extra charge (using the cameras that are already there to support safer driving). One of the reasons Teslas are over 90% less likely to be stolen and stolen teslas are almost always recovered.

 
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inliner311

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The built in sensors in every Tesla includes a built in security system at no extra charge (using the cameras that are already there to support safer driving). One of the reasons Teslas are over 90% less likely to be stolen and stolen teslas are almost always recovered.

Do you have a Tesla? I think someone asked you this before but I couldn't remember if you do.

I've fantasize about cars and understand how it can be. I have also gotten those cars and at the end of the day, its just another car and it will have it's strengths and faults. You might be best served to just layoff reading all the hype that Telsa puts out if you will eventually get one. You seem already sold on getting one. You might over hype yourself and be in for a huge let down once you get it.
 
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KI4MVP

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Do you have a Tesla? I think someone asked you this before but I couldn't remember if you do.

I've fantasize about cars and understand how it can be. I have also gotten those cars and at the end of the day, its just another car and it will have it's strengths and faults. You might be best served to just layoff reading all the hype that Telsa puts out if you will eventually get one. You seem already sold on getting one. You might over hype yourself and be in for a huge let down once you get it.
I don't have one yet, but I am planning to get a model 3 before the end of the year.
 

The Oi

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Right back at you.
I'm not sure why you think ignorance is insulting. There's no personal slight if you're not informed or aware of something. If you are aware and make poor decisions, that's when there's an issue.
When I say someone is being ignorant in a rebuttal you are free to point it out and I will definitely change my tone.
Ignorance is fine. And it’s a learning opportunity for people if one is ready for it and chooses to learn from the person that agrees to do the teaching in an appropriate tone. I’m learning a ton in here right now. It’s great.

Rafters, just the other day you accused david of taking a negative tone with somebody and that it was likely to result in a net negative outcome because he started out the way he did. Then you did this with someone in here.

By all means, if that’s the way you choose to talk to people...you do you. But I’ll tell you that Ty’s assessment of the situation is more correct here in my opinion.

Your opinions are great and are helping me. Your tone did not.
 

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