How do you cook it?

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Hurl Bruce

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Bought ingredients for chili.

It's too late to make for today. Do I make it before bed and let it simmer all night (is that ok to do health-wise?) or do I make it first thing in the morning and eat it at lunchtime?
 

Randolphkeys

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Bought ingredients for chili.

It's too late to make for today. Do I make it before bed and let it simmer all night (is that ok to do health-wise?) or do I make it first thing in the morning and eat it at lunchtime?
You can technically make a chili in three hours, but you are following your instincts well with overnight. Last chili I made I cooked it for four hours, had dinner, then kept it on the lowest setting all night. It was amazing the next day, no health issues with an overnight as long as you don't add dairy beforehand.
 

Randolphkeys

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The other two said it, but low and slow is the way to go. More flavor, and you're just losing water weight
It's a great time of the year for chili too... fresh tomatoes and peppers are in season and cheap. The only upgrade I've done to a classic chili is putting the tomatoes, peppers, and onions on a baking tray in an oven at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes beforehand. When you pull them and let them cool, you can pull off the skins easily and chop up the extra flavorful roasted veggies. That's how an authentic taqueria prepares veggies. The skins aren't a great texture and can be bitter.
 

Hurl Bruce

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I've never roasted veggies or used anything but canned tomatoes. I'll have to try that another time.

Something I put in mine that I like that I don't see a lot of: brown sugar and cinnamon. Not a lot of it, but just enough to give it a bit a sweetness to balance the spiciness.
 

Out of the Rafters at the Q

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It's a great time of the year for chili too... fresh tomatoes and peppers are in season and cheap. The only upgrade I've done to a classic chili is putting the tomatoes, peppers, and onions on a baking tray in an oven at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes beforehand. When you pull them and let them cool, you can pull off the skins easily and chop up the extra flavorful roasted veggies. That's how an authentic taqueria prepares veggies. The skins aren't a great texture and can be bitter.
I haven't made chili in a long time, but i make tomatillo salsa regularly with similar techniques. I typically broil them on high until they're charred. Gives that sweet/smoky flavor. Just sometimes need to replace the bright freshness you lose. Lime and cilantro do the trick.
 

Randolphkeys

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I haven't made chili in a long time, but i make tomatillo salsa regularly with similar techniques. I typically broil them on high until they're charred. Gives that sweet/smoky flavor. Just sometimes need to replace the bright freshness you lose. Lime and cilantro do the trick.
If you like tomatillos you should make white turkey chili sometime. This is the basic recipe but you can riff off of it. It's very low calorie and paleo.


@Hurl Bruce nothing wrong with the cans, my man. I just remember Ohio backyard gardeners swimming in tons of peppers and tomatoes this time of year. My backyard is loaded with lead paint chips, I miss gardens.

My mom would make tons of chili with the fresh garden veggies in a crock pot on Saturdays in September. When I see college football on television, I crave either chili or polish sausage with apples and sauerkraut.
 

Out of the Rafters at the Q

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If you like tomatillos you should make white turkey chili sometime. This is the basic recipe but you can riff off of it. It's very low calorie and paleo.


@Hurl Bruce nothing wrong with the cans, my man. I just remember Ohio backyard gardeners swimming in tons of peppers and tomatoes this time of year. My backyard is loaded with lead paint chips, I miss gardens.

My mom would make tons of chili with the fresh garden veggies in a crock pot on Saturdays in September. When I see college football on television, I crave either chili or polish sausage with apples and sauerkraut.
Oh man... now I'm thinking a lighter sausage (maybe even go chicken?) might pair really well with julienned apple made into like a fresh slaw, with kraut...

Get a nice toasted bun, layer all that in... sprinkle some celery salt... I think I know one of my dinners this week.
 

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I can't tell you how many bowls I had today, but it was a lot.

The last few I didn't even add any sour cream, cheese, or any Fritos like I like to do.
Next thing you gotta do is up the heat, and make some cornbread to go with it.

Deliciously spicy chili with a side of cornbread (or mac and cheese) is such a good pairing
 

FiveThous

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I can't tell you how many bowls I had today, but it was a lot.

The last few I didn't even add any sour cream, cheese, or any Fritos like I like to do.
Chili nachos are always a great call.
 

IWantAKouki

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Shit I haven't even thought about chili since it went from 90 deg days to 40 deg nights so quickly.

I know what I am making tomorrow for the Browns game Sunday.

I typically include charred roasted poblanos, a bit of coffee and a bit of Edmund Fitzgerald. I think chilis that are strong on beer flavor are gimmicky, shouldnt be able to identify that theres beer in it IMO.

RE different ways to eat chili, one of ny favorites is over rice w/ typical chili toppings, along with a sunny side up egg. Mm.
 
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Benway

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I always have the rice on top, with sour cream, chopped raw red onion, and sometimes grated cheese. Of course I've eaten it with nearly any sort of traditional topping you can guess, including corn chips or oyster crackers.

But a sunny-side-up fried egg? That's got my mouth watering.

I'm always looking at new Chili recipes. Chili is the greatest meat stew ever conceived.
 
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