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macbdog

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From the 2012 Draft thread:






Absolute shit draft for Cleveland.
Giolito was the one who changed my view. He took awhile to finally reach that potential but showed with the right approach, you can take an arm like that and bring them back. Giolito was a special arm, too, one of the few I would take a risk that high on; and had he been in better situations early on may have developed far sooner. Tribe even admitted the mistake by taking the chance on Aiken 3 years later (a failed pick but I at least understand their thinking- the mistake was taking a guy who they didn't control his initial rehab).

And that was the draft that really screwed the pooch for the FO, I'm assuming that was Mirabelli's work. That was the draft where I learned not to just assume they knew what they were doing bc it was clear after that debacle they didn't. Naquin, Crowe, etc made me see they didn't know (and still don't, sadly) how to scout, draft and develop OFers. It's pretty bizarre imo.
 

macbdog

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Does this level of hindsight get applied to your own life as well, or just the Indians organization?
Yes, I have no problem looking at my past mistakes and learning from them. I have to for my job. And I think its more than fare to do for the guys paid to run billion dollar pro sports teams.
 

AZ_

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Giolito was the one who changed my view. He took awhile to finally reach that potential but showed with the right approach, you can take an arm like that and bring them back. Giolito was a special arm, too, one of the few I would take a risk that high on; and had he been in better situations early on may have developed far sooner. Tribe even admitted the mistake by taking the chance on Aiken 3 years later (a failed pick but I at least understand their thinking- the mistake was taking a guy who they didn't control his initial rehab).

And that was the draft that really screwed the pooch for the FO, I'm assuming that was Mirabelli's work. That was the draft where I learned not to just assume they knew what they were doing bc it was clear after that debacle they didn't. Naquin, Crowe, etc made me see they didn't know (and still don't, sadly) how to scout, draft and develop OFers. It's pretty bizarre imo.

So crazy, I was in that thread too talking about the enormous risk associated with taking him with what was (at the time) a near certainty that this would wind up in UCL.

Fast forward 9 years and the guy rebuilt his mechanics from the ground up.

Wild.
 

The Oi

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I have a very specific system for getting draft and prospect predictions right.

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kidduck

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I look forward to the day when Jake Bauers will be eligible for discussion in this folder.
 

jup

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So crazy, I was in that thread too talking about the enormous risk associated with taking him with what was (at the time) a near certainty that this would wind up in UCL.

Fast forward 9 years and the guy rebuilt his mechanics from the ground up.

Wild.
And he did a very good job of rebuilding them. Changed his arm action so the ball in his hand stays closer to his head then his elbow until his torso has rotated and his arm then extends. That is the key to saving arms from premature TJ.
 

BimboColesHair

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So crazy, I was in that thread too talking about the enormous risk associated with taking him with what was (at the time) a near certainty that this would wind up in UCL.

Fast forward 9 years and the guy rebuilt his mechanics from the ground up.

Wild.

Just chiming in to add this.

I am so happy to see dominant change-ups on the rise in both the MLB and college baseball. So many talented players who we have never been able to see pan out because of arm issues over the years as kids have started throwing breaking pitches at younger and younger ages.

If all of a sudden we see a rise in younger kids and HS kids throwing change-ups (which I believe is coming) I think Rob Friedman deserves a bunch of credit. Dude loves sharing change-ups on his Twitter, and Giolito and Devin Williams are all over his stuff talking about their own versions.
 

AZ_

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Just chiming in to add this.

I am so happy to see dominant change-ups on the rise in both the MLB and college baseball. So many talented players who we have never been able to see pan out because of arm issues over the years as kids have started throwing breaking pitches at younger and younger ages.

If all of a sudden we see a rise in younger kids and HS kids throwing change-ups (which I believe is coming) I think Rob Friedman deserves a bunch of credit. Dude loves sharing change-ups on his Twitter, and Giolito and Devin Williams are all over his stuff talking about their own versions.

Giolito dropped in 5-10 changeups yesterday that he had absolutely no fear of throwing for a strike.

Ramirez let at least 2-3 go by on the night, all of which dropped over the upper part of the zone.

Its one of the best pitches in baseball, to me. Bieber's knuckle curve probably belongs in that group too, hell of a game.
 

WhoAzcue

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Its one of the best pitches in baseball, to me.
Always has been. Must be hard to throw with the proper deception, though, because you'd think more would work on it.

Mario Soto's changeup was utterly unhittable, even better than Giolito if you can imagine that.

Trevor Hoffman showed you could be a closer with a great one.

Doug Jones had a long career as a closer with an 86 mph fastball (actually a slowball) and a change-up. Really, that's all he had, other than the guts to throw them.
 
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WhoAzcue

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Challenge Update:

Francisco Lindor bWAR: 0.1

Andres Gimenez 0.6 + Amed Rosario -0.1 = 0.5
 
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